Chinese characters, smileys as scientist create DNA 'origami'

Smileys, Chinese characters and card symbols made from DNA. [Supplied]
PHOTO

Smileys, Chinese characters and card symbols made from DNA. [Supplied]

Last Updated: Thu, 31 May 2012 12:34:00 +1000

Harvard University scientists say they have managed to program DNA strands to assemble themselves into smiley emoticons, Chinese characters and card-game symbols at scales of billionths of a metre.

The feat marks the next step in "DNA origami" in which the molecule that provides the genetic code for life is used as a building block at the nanoscale, with potential outlets in engineering and medicine.

DNA is like a twisted ladder with double "rungs" of chemicals which interlock.

By unzipping the ladder and cutting it lengthwise, researchers can create a stretch with a set of single rungs that can partner up with a matching strand.

This is the characteristic harnessed by a team led by Peng Yin of Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.

Reporting in the British journal Nature, the team showed off short lengths of DNA, each 42 "rungs" long, that interlocked with complementary stretches of the molecule.

The strands can be programmed to assemble themselves into specific shapes.

To demonstrate the method, the team made a molecular picture featuring 107 designs, including emoticons, Chinese characters, numbers and letters from the Latin alphabet.

The canvas is a rectangle measuring 64 nanometres by 103 nanometres, with 310 pixels. A nanometre is a billionth of a metre.

Scientists have been interested in nanoscale shapes for more than 20 years, and have progressively moved from two dimensional to three dimensional successes.

The idea is not just for intellectual amusement.

DNA can be used as a framework at the molecular scale, with potential outlets in high technology and medicine.

For instance, work in the lab includes building a DNA "board" for transistors of carbon nano-tubes and devising a clamshell-shaped structure designed to pop open and deliver a minute payload of medicine to zap a cancer cell nearby.

ABC/AFP

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